A momentous meeting of New Milford's town council took place on June 28 as the members voted to approve a final extensive riverfront development and revitalization plan.

According to Mayor Pete Bass, a Riverfront Revitalization Committee was put together in 2017 to get the ball rolling on developing a master plan. In March of 2020, the committee delivered that plan to the town council.

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After multiple hours of hard work, the RRC presented the 2021 Long Range Riverfront Renewal Plan to New Milford's town council on June 28. Some of the plan's highlights include;

  • Townhomes and Apartments
  • Hotel and Event Space
  • Pedestrian Bridge
  • Young's Field Riverfront Park
  • Natives Meadows Preserve and Sculpture Walk
Revitalization Committee's FB Page...

According to former Mayor Liba Fuhrman, who heads up the Revitalization Committee, she explained to News Times;

“Like most towns in Connecticut, our population is aging, so we really want to focus on bringing in families and young millennials. I  just want it to be alive and vibrant. A place for people."

Because of the size of the project, it may be a work in progress over the next ten years but, as each phase is completed, New Milford residents will be able to bask in the glory of New Milford becoming a tourist destination.

The 2021 New Milford Riverfront Revitalization will also include an ice skating path that will turn into a summer splash pad, an outdoor amphitheater with terraced seating. Festival grounds will replace the Youngs Field Road ball fields.

I'm sure that this revitalization will compliment the beauty of downtown New Milford with its idyllic town green along with its unique restaurants and shops. Maybe it's time to think about moving to New Milford!

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