The times, they are a changing, again.

Remember back a few years ago many major retailers made the decision to go where no stores had gone before and start their Black Friday deals on Thanksgiving Day? That decision was met with mixed emotions as some were elated to get out of the house and away from the relatives sooner, and some were not happy that retail came before family and employees had to cut their Thanksgiving gatherings a little shorter so they could go to work.

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Earlier this year, Target announced that they will no longer open any of its stores on Thanksgiving Day, and this week they made it official, and put an exclamation point on it saying they will always be closed on Thanksgiving from now on.

The retail giant made the move after a number of other retail chains opted not to open last year due to the pandemic, and instead spread out their big sales over the course of time and online. It was a move that was put into effect to limit big crowds during the pandemic, and give employees a little time off after all they had been through with COVID-19.

After retail sales last November and December rose, over 8.2% from 2019, it was kind of a no brainer for the store to implement the same strategy this year and for the future as well considering The National Retail Federation is forecasting that this Holiday Season could even shatter the record from last year as sales are already projected to climb to between 8.5% and 10.5%.

After this move by Target, it will be interesting to see if other stores follow their lead and close on Thanksgiving as well. Like we said earlier, the times, they are a changing, again.

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