Over the years, Connecticut has been hit with some massive storms that not only left millions of dollars in damage, but major erosion of the shoreline.

The Connecticut shoreline has been battered over the years with hurricanes, Nor'easters and flooding, but now a recent study from Rutgers University has shows alarming statistics and it looks like the Connecticut coast line is changing faster than anyone anticipated, and it may have little to do with the major storms that we have seen hit the Connecticut coast.

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According to wtnh.com, Jennifer S. Walker, Ph.D. and a Lab Research Associate at Rutgers University is blaming the acceleration on the rising sea levels. Of course climate change, which seems to have triggered the rising sea levels, is also included in the mix.

The article went on to explain that oceans have been rising for the last 2000 years, which is a direct cause of nature, melting ice caps, and sinking land. The rate which was used to be extremely low, has nearly doubled over the last 1,200 years.

We all know beach front houses get pounded during extremely bad storms, but now even smaller disturbances are causing flood waters to rise to dangerous levels that effect local property owners. It is estimated that flooding now occurs at these properties at least twice a month, and residents are starting to take notice.

The research also illustrates that this rise in the ocean level is not only going to continue at an alarming rate, but believe it or not, it's going to get worse.

So what's the easy fix? There are a number of things that should be happening including building new properties farther away from the water and building them higher to avoid possible flooding. Of course, people need to do their part too and be vigilant to avoid polluting the local coastal waters and be more aware of keeping things green. If not, the end result could be catastrophic to the coastline and the state sooner rather then later.

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